To celebrate the festive season, the Whisky Exchange have released their first ever Christmas malt.

The limited edition single malt is a 17-year-old Speyside from an unnamed family-owned distillery.

Matured in Oloroso sherry butts and bottled at 58.7% abv, there are just 1800 bottles available exclusively from The Whisky Exchange.

Posting on their website, the spirits specialists wrote:

“For the nights before Christmas,
when snug in your house,
Or, carefully wrapped,
‘neath the tree for your spouse.
A Christmas Malt
that’s been selected with care,
From a Speyside distillery,
though we can’t tell you where.”

It’s been described by the team as the “perfect winter dram, full of festive sherry-cask flavour” and “just the thing for enjoying with family and friends this Christmas”.

Billy Abbot of the Whisky Exchange  said: “This Speyside single malt Scotch whisky captures the essence of Christmas with rich buttery spice and sticky cherries, hints of holly-wreath leafiness and Christmas-tree pine.”

THE WHISKY EXCHANGE CHRISTMAS SINGLE MALT TASTING NOTES

Whisky Exchange Christmas Malt

Picture: Whisky Exchange

Nose: As a great man once said: “It’s Christmaaas!” – that pretty much describes this. It starts with a Christmas stocking of caramels and toffees, a bag of chocolate raisins, apples and oranges.

Redcurrant jelly and Christmas pudding follow, rich and raisiny, with brandy butter and a dusting of spice. There’s a glass of port for afters, with buttery mince pies.

And after all of that, there’s a hint of damp leaves and earth – did someone knock the Christmas tree over again?

Palate: Buttery spice and plump, sugary dried fruit kick things off, with a fruit bowl of apples and oranges on the side. Rich Christmas cake appears, with chewy fruit and nuts – prettily-arranged Dundee cake almonds, freshly cracked walnuts, dates and stewed plums.

Florentines follow: glacé cherries, syrupy nuts and crisp chocolate. Savoury notes hide under the cake, with toasted oak, singed raisins and a touch of bitter char.

Finish: Sticky cherries and raisins burst across the palate, slowly fading to leave festive spice, and a hint of holly-wreath leafiness and Christmas-tree pine.

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things whisky-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over six years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink.

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