Festival season is just around the corner, so where and when are some of the best places to enjoy Scotland's finest produce?

It’s not long now before we can enjoy longer days and sunnier skies (hopefully). which only means one thing. It’s festival season.

With this in mind, we take a look at some of the top food and drink festivals that are making a return to Scotland, starting from this month.

North Hop

(30th-31st March, Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre, Exhibition Ave, Bridge of Don, Aberdeen AB23 8BL)

Tickets: £16 per session


Picture: North Hop Facebook

North Hop first hit Aberdeen in 2015, and has gone from strength to strength ever since – with subsequent festivals taking place across cities in Scotland.

The festival, which runs from 30th-31st March at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre (AECC), is set to boast a number of exhibitors from Aberdeen and across Scotland celebrating craft beer, cider, gins and artisan spirits, cocktails, and a selection of street food vendors.

As well as this there will be an impressive line-up of up-and-coming Scottish music acts.

Mhor Festival

(25th-27th May, Monachyle Mhor Farm, Balquhidder, Perthshire FK19 8PQ)

Tickets: from £10 for a day pass (Friday) and £80 for weekend camping)


Picture: Mhor Festival Facebook

Taking place over the spring bank holiday weekend, this foodie festival has grown to become a much-loved addition to the spring/summer lineup in Scotland.

Hosted by the owners of Monachyle Mhor Hotel (who also own cool motel Mhor 84), this festival is fun for all the family with a great selection of food and drink, and events such as the annual raft race.

In addition to this, there are also theatre, music and dance events happening all weekend.

Whilst the whole festival is a food-lovers haven, it’s the Friday night that goes all out thanks to the coveted 5-course Mhor Feast, which is cooked by five different chefs, and only available to a lucky 100 guests (pre-booking essential, tickets £70).

Scottish Street Food Festival

(18th-20th May, 100 Pointhouse Road, Glasgow G3 8RS)

Tickets: from £5


Picture: Scottish Street Food Festival Facebook

Back by popular demand, this Glasgow foodie fest takes place by the iconic Riverside Museum on the banks of the Clyde.

This year’s festival is dedicated to showcasing Scotland’s finest street food, including vegan options.

There will also be a farmers market of local and sustainable Scottish produce and a fish and shellfish area promoting the best of Scotland’s harbouring seas.

Those in search of a beverage will enjoy the range of cocktails, wines and craft beers, as well as coffees and juices.


(31st March and 15th April, various locations around Edinburgh)

Tickets: from £5, average around £12


Picture: Edinburgh International Science Festival Facebook

Part of Edinburgh’s Science Festival, GastroFest is a mini festival which mixes gastronomy and science.

Food producers, chefs and mixologists will explore all experiences of eating and drinking through demonstrations, workshops, exhibitions and talks.

From Baking in Space, Cheeseology 3.0 (top of our list), how to create a £1 meal and a talk on giving up meat to save the planet, this festival has something for all tastes and ages.


(1st-3rd June, Fyne Ales, Achadunan, Cairndow, Argyll, PA26 8BJ)

Tickets: from £42.50 for a day ticket, no camping



Picture: Fynefest 2018 Facebook

Set up in 2010 by the Fyne Ales team as a small beer, music and local food festival, Fynefest has grown over the years from 350 visitors in the early days to over 2000 to date.

Celebrating Scottish produce, the award-winning festival takes place in the Fyne Ales brewery estate and this year will play host many fine producers such as Loch Fyne Oysters, Winston Churchill Venison, Highland Hog Roast and Babu Bombay Street Kitchen.

The  festival will also serve over 200 different beers in the Courtyard Bar and Brewery Tap Room and Brewer’s Bar and Cocktail Lounge.

For those looking to soak up the beautiful scenery, a drink can be enjoyed at the Walker’s Bar located an hour’s walk up Glen Fyne in an old bothy.

Live music is also a big part of the festival, and a range of bands playing an eclectic mix of music will be on stage from the Friday night.

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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