M&S are now selling a pack of six mini cheese Easter eggs - ideal for savoury fans this Easter weekend.

With Easter only a few weeks away, it’s almost time to enjoy chocolate at all times of the day. But if you fancy a break from the sweet stuff then M&S have the answer – cheese Easter eggs,

As of today, stores will be stocking six packs of mini cheese Easter eggs, which look surprisingly like real eggs.

The newly launched wax-covered Mini Cheesy Eggs are made with Barber’s Farmhouse Cheddar and a vintage 18-month matured Red Leicester “yolk” and come in a cardboard egg box.

Chocolate vs cheese

Cheese Easter

Picture: M&S

New research from M&S Food shows that although a quarter of adults in Scotland (24 per cent) say they never get tired of eating chocolate at Easter, almost four in 10 (37 per cent) say they actually prefer eating cheese over chocolate, and over a quarter (32 per cent) would rather give up their chocolate than cheese at Easter.

M&S Product Developer, Rosie Eiduks says, “Delicious as it is, we know not everyone loves chocolate, and that people in Scotland are actually divided between Team Sweet and Team Savoury.

“Those with a more savoury-tooth can sometimes feel left out of the fun at Easter, so this year, we wanted to create a must-have gift for cheese lovers too!

“Not only are our Mini Cheesy Eggs a picture-perfect gift, they’re also completely delicious, with our quality Barber’s Farmhouse Cheddar and a vintage Red Leicester yolk. Beautiful served on an Easter lunch cheeseboard, sliced into a sandwich or salad, or loaded on top of crackers.”

The Mini Cheesy eggs are £8.50 and in store now. Each egg has been hand-dipped in a duck egg blue wax ‘shell’ and is roughly the size of large hen’s eggs.

For an even bigger cheesy hit, a Big Cheesy Egg, £8.00, 300g, (roughly the dimensions of a goose egg) will also be available in 250 M&S stores from Wednesday 18th March.

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About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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