The team at Eddie's Seafood Market in Edinburgh have shared this recipe for Harris gin infused salmon.

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Campbell Mickel, Michelin-Bib awarded chef and owner of Merienda Restaurant and now owner of Eddie's Seafood Market in Edinburgh has shared this easy to make recipe for gin and beetroot infused salmon - ideal for a weekend breakfast. Campbell said: "The delicate notes were used to bathe the salmon before being submerged under an avalanche of earthy beet-infused curing mix. This holds a blend of aromatics and botanicals which highlight and enlighten the delicate notes of the Isle of Harris Gin."

Ingredients

  • 1 kg trimmed & skinned loin of the best Salmon you can find, such as Loch Duart
  • 300ml Harris Gin
  • 350g Fresh Bulls Blood Beetroot, coarsely grated
  • 400g Coarse Sea Salt
  • 250g Soft Brown Sugar
  • 20g Juniper Berries
  • 10g Black Peppercorn
  • 20g Fennel Seeds
  • 2g Garlic Powder
  • Zest from 1 large Orange, finely grated.

Method

Trim the salmon so you have about 1 kg of centre cut loin with little belly fat.

Bathe the salmon in the gin and pop in the fridge for one hour, turning every 15 minutes.

Blitz the aromatics (juniper, pepper, fennel, garlic and orange zest) in a pestle and mortar until you get it nice and smooth.

Combine with the grated beets and mix with the salt and sugar.

Lay four sheets of cling film out one atop the other – at least three lengths of the loin in length.

In the centre, spread half the curing mixture out and place the boozy salmon loin on it.

Now cover with the remaining cure mix and fold left side over, then the other.

Now pull the bottom of the cling film over, then the top weaving a nice neat parcel.

Put that aside and lay out another large sheet and place the loin over the end and tightly roll round keeping it as tight as can be until the parcel is completely encased in the wrapping.

Pop on an oven tray and weight down under another tray with four tins (for example tins of beans) placed on top

Press the salmon in the fridge for 48 hours turning every 12 hours.

After two full days, remove from the fridge, cut the salmon from the cling film parcel and wash under gently running cold water.

Place on a lint-free cloth and pat dry entirely.

The salmon should be firm and very purple.

This can now be wrapped in fresh cling film and stored in the fridge until required.

It will last in the fridge for five or six days and can also be made in advance and frozen for a short period of time until needed.

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.