The company behind a whisky distillery in Angus have submitted plans to create a new visitor centre for the site. 

The planning application, submitted to Angus Council, outlines proposals to create a brand-new visitor experience at Glencadam distillery and will involve significant investment from owners Angus Dundee Distillers.

The proposal includes plans to develop existing buildings to incorporate a unique tour, whisky tasting area, tea room and shop, all designed to celebrate the history and heritage of Glencadam, one of the oldest distilleries in Scotland.

If planning permission is successful then work would start in 2019 with an estimated date for completion in 2020.

The proposed designs will retain the original sandstone facade of the existing buildings, together with other integral features that date back almost 200 years, and blend this with some innovative new architecture.

There will also be newly designed offices, meeting rooms and tasting lab for the distillery team, all located in the original floor maltings, which are no longer in operation.

Distillery manager Doug Fitchett said: “We are delighted to be a part of this development of the distillery, which will give our visitors from the UK and around the world the chance to really experience what makes Glencadam unique.

“There is so much history here and great stories to tell, and some excellent whiskies to try of course.

“The development will also be a great boost for the area, and I think we’ll see a big increase in tourists and local people coming into Brechin, to tour the distillery and visit out new shop and tea room.”

Glencadam Distillery was established in 1825 and has had an interesting history, having been closed during both World Wars when it was used to barrack soldiers. It was mothballed in 2000 and lay silent for three years before being bought by Angus Dundee in 2003.

The distillery itself has been mostly unchanged throughout the years, and has just two stills, which produce a unique “Eastern Highlands” style of whisky, which is described as “very fruity and slightly spicy”.

 

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things whisky-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over six years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink.

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