A sister restaurant to hugely popular Edinburgh bar 99 Hanover Street has recently opened, and offers a range of great drinks and dishes inspired by Chilean cuisine.

83 Hanover Street is the first dining project from the former Gleneagles restaurant manager and current 99 Hanover Street owner, Juan Jose Castillo Castro.

Chilean born Juan says his newest venture will follow the same template as its sister bar accompanied by some modern South American cuisine.

83 Hanover Street offers a modern menu of small plates showcasing fabulous Scottish ingredients prepared simply and playing tribute to Juan’s multicultural upbringing with influences of Chilean and Swedish cuisine.

The menu celerates bold and rich flavours presented across an array of small plates, ideal for sharing.

There is a focus on bespoke charcuterie created by East Coast Cured, which hang on display at the open kitchen and bar, as well an emphasis on citrus cured seafood and grilled cuts of meat.

Hanover

Picture: Tony McGuire

Other dishes on the menu include Sopaipillas, a Chilean pumpkin bread, quinoa salads and Juan’s mother’s empanadas.

The food is accompanied by a selection of wines with traditional cellar practices, as well as some natural ones, from Europe and South America that have been carefully chosen by Peter Brodie (former restaurant manager at Timberyard) and will be available by the glass and carafe.

There are also traditional cocktails with a twist, including classic Pisco creations.

83 Hanover Street seats about 50 with a bar as its focal point, presenting the opportunity for counter top dining.

The interiors convey a contemporary, rustic feel; distressed walls  complement dark wood detailing and copper lighting, and contrast with burnt orange and yellow leather banquette seating.

The bar seats seven where guests can enjoy their meal next to the buzz of the open kitchen and charcuterie counter – a great spot for those stopping for a quick bite and drink, and perfect for the solo diner at the counter top.

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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