Feragaia is Scotland’s first premium alcohol-free spirit, which has been made from land and sea botanicals.

Meaning wild earth, the new alcohol-free spirit, which has an amber hue, is distilled, blended and bottled in the Scottish Lowlands.

Feragaia (fer-a-guy-a) has a complex but clean taste and warming finish, which is best enjoyed over ice or with a light tonic.

 Made to reflect the changing drinking culture – with many people now choosing no or low alcohol brands – the spirit has been created to offer a premium and satisfying alternative to an alcoholic drink.

With a combined 10 years in the global spirits market (on both sides of the Atlantic) co-founders Jamie and Bill have spent the past year crafting a spirit that they are proud of.

How it is made?

alcohol-free spirit

Picture: Victoria Cranstoun

Most alcohol-free spirits rely on alcohol to carry flavour in the process, this is then stripped out along with natural flavours of the botanicals.

Feragaia never touches alcohol meaning it retains all the natural flavours and qualities of its ingredients.

Combining traditional distillation techniques, the process brings together 14 responsibly sourced botanicals from both land and sea including flower, leaves and roots.

These delicate flavours of flowers and leaves combine with the earthier notes of root botanicals and spices to create a complex and layered drink.

These natural flavours are captured through multiple distillation runs, blended by hand and cut with pure Scottish water.

Tasting notes

Victoria Cranstoun

Smell and first taste include citrus from blackcurrant leaf, kaffir lime and lemon verbena followed chamomile, pink peppercorn and serrated wrack (seaweed).

This takes the drinker all the way to a light smokey note and lengthy, warming finish from cayenne pepper.

Feragaia is priced at £28 and is available online or at at Mac & Wild in both Fitzrovia and Devonshire Square sites.

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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