A rare miniature of blended whisky that was bottled for Billy Connolly and sold at one of his gigs in the 1970s could be sold for a high price when it goes under the hammer in Glasgow later this month.

One of the last known bottles of Nippy Sweetie, which it is believed was sold at the Glasgow gigs by the ‘lady who also sold the ice-creams’, is expected to fetch between £200-£300 when it appears at McTear’s Rare and Collectable Whisky Auction on 27th April.

Laurie Black, McTear’s whisky specialist, said: “We have had some unusual whiskies through our doors over the years but I don’t think I have ever come across anything linked to Billy Connolly.

Billy Connolly whisky

Picture: McTears

“It may have a comedy connection but it will be no laughing matter when the bidding starts on this very rare bottle. It is a fantastic item and we are expecting lots of interest from home and overseas.”

In February 2016 – before this latest example came to light – what was thought to be the last known bottling of Nippy Sweetie was donated to the Art of Billy Connolly exhibition at the People’s Palace in Glasgow by whisky firm, Douglas Laing & Co.

Joining Nippy Sweetie in the April auction will be a number of other rare blended whiskies.

main2

Picture: McTears

A 25 year old bottle of ‘Pre-War Strength’ Chivas Regal, which it is believed was distilled around 1908, is expected to fetch up to £3,000, while a bottle of Jonnie Walker that was bottled ‘to commemorate the opening of the new premises of John Walker & Sons Ltd. at Hill Street, Kilmarnock on 11th September 1956’, has an estimate of £1,000 to £1,200.

Claire Douglas from McTear’s, said: “In the world of Scotch whisky, it is always thought the big, bold single malts are the bottles that command the big money at auction, but these bottles show that blended whiskies are also much in demand, with good examples providing a first class investment opportunity.”

• McTear’s Rare & Collectable Whisky Auction will take place in Glasgow on Wednesday 27th April. For more information, visit www.mctears.co.uk.

Let us know what you think

comments