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Locals invited to invest in Dingwall's first whisky distillery for 90 years

A whisky firm has launched a community share offer in a bid to build the first community-owned distillery in Scotland.

Published: April 16, 2016
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Glenwyvis Distillery Community Benefit Society plans to raise £1.5 million to develop a new distillery in Dingwall.

The launch, organised in conjunction with Community Shares Scotland (CSS), offers investment opportunities from £250 to locals living in all IV postcode areas.

The developers hope this will ensure a high level of local ownership of the distillery.

Shares are also open to whisky lovers worldwide with investment opportunities of up to £100,000.

Helicopter pilot and farmer, John F Mckenzie, is behind the plans to resurrect whisky production in the town some 90 years after its last distillery closed.

He said: "From the outset we have envisaged the project as more than a distillery. It is an opportunity for all social investors to help reinvigorate the historic town of Dingwall. GlenWyvis will be built on its whisky heritage, its community-ownership and its environmental credentials."

CSS programme manager Kelly McIntyre said: "This is one of the biggest community projects we have been involved in and we hope it will make a seismic impact in the kind of projects that we will see coming forward to work with Community Shares Scotland in the future."

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Construction of the new distillery is due to start in June and the first whisky is planned for Burns Night 2017.

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