In case you haven't heard, an exciting new Bavarian-style Brau Haus will be coming to Glasgow's Bothwell Street this November. Here's everything you need to know.

What is Bavaria Brau Haus? 

Bavaria Brau Haus is a new independent venue from Raymond Codona; the restaurant and beer house is hoping to be the biggest German-themed licensed premises in the city.

Offering some of the best beers from Germany’s famous brewing region as well as some traditional German cuisine, the establishment will give visitors a taste of all things Bavaria.

The contemporary Bavarian Beer Hall interior and warm friendly staff aim to create a uniquely convivial atmosphere

Where is it? 

The striking A-listed building at 30 Bothwell Street – formerly the site of Madness Theatre of Fun – has undergone a £1m renovation and redesign and will now be home to the new Brau Haus bar and restaurant.

Just a short walk from both Central and Queen Street station, the venue is easily accessible from all areas of the city centre.

When will it open?

The group have confirmed the opening date of the new Brau Haus will be Thursday 12th November, visit www.bavariabrauhaus.com or follow them on twitter @BrauhausGla for details on the opening weekend offers.

What will be the opening times? 

The Brau Haus will open from 12pm-12am daily, Monday-Sunday.

What beers will be on offer? 

The selection of German Beers will be extensive, with six beers on tap and over forty bottled beers. Customers will have the option of enjoying the ice cold beers served in huge stein glasses by their dedicated team of staff.

The beer offering will revolve around the classic ‘Big 6’ that dominate the Munich brewing scene – Spaten, Hofbrau, Hacken-Pschorr, Augestiner brau, Paulaner, and Lowenbrau.

Löwenbräu

The Löwenbräu brand has strong connections to its place-of-origin roots which date back to as early as 1324. Brewed on 17 Löwenbruge Street and served in the Zur Löwen pub, the brand adopted the Löwenbräu name.

The historical king of the beer world, the name Löwenbräu translates fittingly to “lions brew”, which is illustrated through their iconic gold lion brand logo. Löwenbräu has just enough herbal hop bitterness and faint lemon sweetness to create a well-balanced and super easy drink.

Hofbräu

Everybody knows of the ‘Haus’ but without “Horbräu” the beer, there can be no Hofbräuhaus. Hofbräu is recognised for its royal connections to Duke Wilhelm the 5th who founded the Hofbräuhaus and brewery in 1589.

Hauffbrau

Picture: Hofbräu

The Hofbräu brand bears a royal crown and a gold glowing liquid that depicts its regal roots and 16th century beginnings. The beer has a crisp finish but not overdone and the spicy hop bite balances with a sweetness left lingering on the palate.

Augustinerbräu

Augustiner is renowned for brewing Munich’s best beer. As early as 1328, the Augustiner Brothers were brewing beer within the Augustinian monastery in Munich. With about 680 years of tradition, Augustinerbräu is the city’s oldest brewery and has survived many extensions without ever forgetting its philosophy or risking the quality of its beer.

Augustinerbräu is mostly sweet with faint hints of honey and a soft bitterness on the aftertaste. Its pale yellow complexion and full white head is smooth and quaffable.

Paulaner

A close second in the Brau Haus’ opinion as Munich’s best beer- Paulaner is also a monastic brew, originating in the Nuedeck monastery in 1629.

Picture: Paulaner

Picture: Paulaner

As a result of an unsuccessful complaint filed against the Paulaner monks to ban sales of their home-brewed beer; February 24th, 1634 is a special date as it marks the official founding date of the Paulaner brewery.

The highly skilled Master brewer Franz Xavier Zacherl put Paulaner on the map and the popularity of Paulaner has always extended beyond the city limits of Munich.

Hacker-Pschorr

This consolidation of two Munich breweries is really a throwback since Hackerbräu and Pschorrbräu were actually one and the same in the early 1800s. Once considered the king of Munich’s brewers, the Pschorr sons went their separate ways and divided the brewing business into Pschorr and Hacker wings.

Picture:

Picture: Hacker-Pschorr

Both brothers prospered and so did their brands, becoming friendly rivals in the brewing world. However when tragedy struck, blood was thicker than beer and the two breweries joined once again, hyphenating the brand to Hacker-Pschorr Bräu.

Spatenbräu

The Spaten name stretches back to 1937 where records show the existence of a brewery owned by a Herr Spaeth who was busy producing his “Oberspathbräu”. Under ownership of perhaps one of the most famous brewing families Munich has ever produced- Gabriel Sedlmayr and his sons Josef and Gabriel II, the name was later modified to Spaten around 1807.

Picture: Spaten

Picture: Spaten

Like the Pschorr brothers, the Sedlmayr siblings parted and began brewing competitive beers, however World War I brought back the united Spaten brand. Spatenbräu is a premium, bottom fermented golden lager with a supremely well balanced hop flavour.

What other drinks will be on offer? 

If you’re not (yet) a beer drinker, then Brau Haus will also stock a range of wine, spirits and flavoured cider as well as an exciting Bavarian inspired cocktail list, written by their very own creative bar team.

What food will be on offer? 

The Bavarian menu at the Brauhaus will be hearty and rustic, using very simple ingredients to make tasty, satisfying dishes.

Their new menu pays homage to the authentic tastes and cuisine of Bavaria. Their in-haus team of chefs have devised some famous authentic Bavarian dishes, made from pure and carefully sourced ingredients.

Food2

Bavarian food is full of flavour, ranging from the hearty
tastes of the colder months to the light and fresh flavours of Spring and Summer. Incorporating flavours from neighbouring Austria – the team at Brau Haus have created contemporary Bavarian menus that are sure to tantalize the taste-buds.

White Hart

The menu on offer will include classic dishes like Swiss Bratwurst, Schnitzel (veal) and traditional Bavarian sausages as well as more modern twists such as Southern smoked BBQ pork belly.

 

What will it look like inside?

The layout of the Brau Haus will take over both floors in the building and will include a mezzanine with additional seating. While the interior will be designed to reflect the unique decorations and classic aesthetics of a traditional German Beer Hall.

Glasgow artist Nichol Wheatley will paint a one-of-a-kind mural across the ceiling of the building.

What is the mural? 

Titled “A Poem in Paint” (For Alasdair Gray), the mural is references a traditional German celebration of the bounties of
nature and their enjoyment, as seen in traditional beer halls in Munich.

BrauhausMuralJPG

Hidden within the mural is a portrait of Nichol’s idol, friend and colleague Alasdair Gray. The trees echo an idea that they have had for the next stage of Oran Mor and the birds are symbols of his inspiration, a wee metaphor for the books, plays and art that he has made over the years.

Brauhaus Mural 2

• For more information check out the website www.bavariabrauhaus.com, their Facebook or follow them on Twitter @BrauhausGla 

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things drinks-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over 10 years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink. Recently, his first book was published. Dubbed Gin Galore, it explores Scotland's best gins and the stories behind those that make them.

Let us know what you think

comments