M&S have collaborated with the Old Curiosity Distillery to create a new alcohol-free G&T in a can.

M&S, in partnership with the Old Curiosity Distillery, has launched its first ever alcohol-free G&T in a can, which is ideal for non-drinkers, designated drivers or those looking to cut back.

The sparkling botanical G&T is made using a blend of quality, fragrant botanicals including – juniper, coriander, lemon balm, cardamom and angelica, mixed with a refreshing tonic and costs £1.50 per 250ml can.

For a perfect serve, simply pour over ice with a lemon or cucumber garnish or enjoy straight from the tin.

The botanicals used for making the drink are from Edinburgh-based distillery, The Old Curiosity, who have worked with M&S to launch the hugely popular colour changing rose and lavender gins.

The distillery was launched in 2017 as part of the Secret Herb Garden, which boasts a range of 600 naturally grown and tendered varieties of herbs and flowers.

Low or no trend

The trend for low and no alcohol options is on the rise as shown in a 2020 Portman Group study, which reported that almost a quarter (23 per cent) of alcohol drinkers were likely to consider switch to lower alcohol/alcohol free alternatives this year.

This switch is led by younger drinkers where one in ten are actively drinking lower alcohol options.

Jenny Rea, M&S drinks product developer said: “This alcohol-free G&T tastes just like the real thing. All the flavours are there, from the juniper notes to those fragrant botanicals that add to that classic gin taste. It is truly delicious.

“I am sure it is going to be a huge hit with customers – at Christmas 2018 we launched a larger bottle of this no alcohol G&T that proved so popular with customers – we kept it on as a permanent fixture in our food halls – customers loved it.”

The Old Curiosity has also recently launched a new gin in partnership with Aldi.

Eidyn (pronounced ee-din), named after the Scottish Gaelic for Edinburgh, has been developed exclusively for Aldi by The Old Curiosity Distillery, which is located outside of the city below the Pentland Hills.

Scran episode 4: The botanics of gin – with Hamish Martin of the Secret Herb Garden

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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