To celebrate the diversity of smoke, Ardbeg have teamed up DJ BBQ (aka Christian Stevenson) to create a collection of smoky recipes, featuring everyone’s favourite summer tool, the barbecue.

  • 18 hours
  • 10
  • Medium
This 18 hour pulled pork is made using Ardbeg whisky and smoked for hours before being enjoyed in brioche rolls. Best enjoyed with a hot or cold cider spiked with Ardbeg Wee Beastie.

Ingredients

  • 1 x 4-5kg pork shoulder, neck end with the rind removed and blade bone left in
  • • 10 x brioche rolls
  • • Half a bottle of Ardbeg whisky
  • Rub
  • • 1 tbsp sea salt flakes
  • • 1 tbsp cracked black pepper
  • • 1 tbsp ground coriander
  • • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • • 1 tbsp paprika
  • • 1 tsp mustard powder
  • • 1 tsp chilli powder
  • • 2 tbsp light brown sugar
  • Slaw
  • • ½ small white cabbage, finely sliced
  • • 1 x red onion, peeled and finely sliced
  • • 1 x red chilli, sliced
  • • 3 x tbsp mayonnaise
  • • 2 x tbsp malt vinegar
  • Special Equipment
  • • Foil tray
  • • Smoker
  • • Dried wood for fuel

Method

Set up and heat your smoker with the dried wood to 150C.

You’ll need to start smoking your pork 18hrs before you want to eat.

Mix all the rub ingredients together and liberally rub over the prepared pork shoulder.

Place in the smoker and reduce the smoker to 115C.

Fill the foil tin with 100ml whisky and 100ml water and place the tin next to the pork in the smoker.

Keep an eye on the liquid level as it may need topping up with the same quantities midway through.

While the pork smokes, flick over more of the half water and half whisky with your fingers to keep the crust moist.

To make the slaw, mix everything together in a bowl and set aside.

After 18 hours, carefully remove the cooked pork from the smoker and place in a roasting tray.

Pull the pork into tender pieces, checking the seasoning once you’re done.

Toast your buns on the firebox and serve the smoked pork with the slaw and the toasted buns.

 

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.