Scotsman Review
Our criteria 
  • Ambience - It's important that a restaurant is inviting. We rate the decor, comfort and atmosphere.
  • Drink - Is the wine or cocktail list as exciting as the food, or does it fall short? Same goes for soft drinks. 
  • Food - We judge dishes on flavour, but also use of produce, cooking skill and presentation
  • Service - The staff and pace of a meal can make or break a meal out.
  • Value - From the food on the plate to service and surroundings, we check that you get what you're paying for.
Ambiance
8/10
Food
8/10
Total
0%
May 5, 2024

Kyloe, Edinburgh, review - steak and cocktails in new-look Rutland Hotel

This Edinburgh hotel and restaurants have had a multimillion pound revamp. Rosalind Erskine went along to see what’s new.

While Edinburgh’s beautiful old buildings provide a backdrop for its iconic scenery, what’s inside can often change on a regular basis, but there are a few that have been home to - now much-loved institutions - for years.

One of these is The Rutland Hotel, located in Edinburgh’s west end, just across from the Johnnie Walker Experience. Originally built in the 1800s, The Rutland was once home to renowned surgeon Joseph Lister.

Now, it has just gone through an extensive £1.2M refurbishment, giving the hotel and its restaurants - The Huxley bar and Kyloe - a modern new look.

Birmingham-based interior design firm, Tibbatts Abel, have been in charge of the revamp, which includes Mulberry wallpaper and a bath butler package in the hotel and an American-inspired, clubby look in Kyloe.

Kyloe review

In the Huxley there’s a refreshed menu that celebrates Scottish classics with a touch of American soul, in revamped surroundings that seamlessly blend Retro Americana with Art Deco.

Louise MacLean, Business Development Manager for Signature Pubs, who own the venue said: “Whilst these three venues stand alone in their offerings, character and design, they are united in their shared vision to deliver unforgettable experiences with top level Scottish hospitality in an iconic Edinburgh location providing a well-placed offer ideal for international tourists, corporate visitors and locals alike.” 

In the mood for a slap-up meal and a few cocktails, following a tour of the Johnnie Walker Experience, we visited Kyloe on a busy Saturday night. Inside the new-look restaurant there’s maroon leather booth seating as well as dark wood tables and chairs.

Wood panelling, statement lights and framed prints of cows complete the look along with an arty bulls head bust on the wall.

These days it’s always nice to know a bit about restaurant suppliers, especially when it comes to meat, and Kyloe have detailed this in their menu which states: “One of our longest standing supplier relationships is with Hardiesmill Ethical Scotch Beef, a farm based in the Scottish Borders which uses only pedigree Aberdeen Angus beef and supplies it exclusively to 12 clients worldwide. They are globally recognised as having the highest standard in welfare from nose to plate, meaning they, and we, can proudly fly the flag for Scottish Ethical Beef.”

We kicked off the night with a negroni and an old fashioned - classically made favourites that went down well. These were followed by a bread plate of two thin slices of focaccia and a cheese topped, golden bread roll served with whipped butter.

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For starters, I chose the Scottish monkfish scampi (£14) served with tartare sauce, parsley and caper dressing, cucumber and samphire. While my boyfriend opted for the Scotch steak tartare (£16).

This was served with a confit egg yolk, gherkin ketchup, bloody Mary purée and  parmesan crisp. Despite often being a heavy dish, the meaty monkfish was fresh and delicate while the creamy egg yolk, gherkin ketchup and bloody Mary puree cut through the richness of the tartare.

For mains, we shared the chateaubriand (£72). Perfectly cooked medium rare, we chose a béarnaise and red wine and blue cheese sauce, for dunking - the richness of both complementing the simple steak.

It was hard to decide on which sides to go for, so we went daft and ordered a few including a blooming onion (£9), truffle mac and cheese (£6), hand cut chips with Parmesan cheese (£6) and grilled Portobello mushrooms with garlic butter (£5).

The onion had crispy outer layers giving way to soft fried onions, and was the best by far. The truffle mac and cheese wasn't so truffle heavy that it overpowered the dish,  and the cheese provided a salty bite against the steak.

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The chips were absolutely fine and as advertised while the mushrooms were well cooked with the garlic butter adding some richness.

Despite that feast, there was still room to share a dessert of rum spiced pineapple (£8.50). This came with a light coconut sorbet, toasted cashew nut granola which added texture and pineapple crisps for a hint of sweetness - a refreshing end to the meal.

Kyloe may look a bit different but there was no need to change up the menu, and for good reason. This is a classic, classy steak restaurant that delivers on service, and quality of the cooking and dishes.

It’s an ideal place to spend a Saturday night, whiling away a couple of hours over a steak, well-made drinks and good company. Its location was always going to do this venue favours, but the fact it has been open for as long as it has, and remains as popular as it is says a lot about picking a theme and doing it well. Here’s its high quality beef, classic starters and stand-out sides.

Next time I’ll be making a weekend of it and booking in to see exactly what a bath butler package entails. This may be a classic historic Edinburgh building, but you can’t say it’s not moving with the times.

Right to Roam, Rothes golf club, review - go for the cinnamon butteries and coffee, stay for venison schnitzel 
Tags:
Kyloe, Rutland Street, Edinburgh, UK
Kyloe, Rutland Street, Edinburgh, UK, EH1 2AE
Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne, whisky and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind is the Food and Drink Editor and whisky writer for The Scotsman, as well as hosting Scran, The Scotsman's food and drink podcast.
Scotsman Review
Our criteria 
  • Ambience - It's important that a restaurant is inviting. We rate the decor, comfort and atmosphere.
  • Drink - Is the wine or cocktail list as exciting as the food, or does it fall short? Same goes for soft drinks. 
  • Food - We judge dishes on flavour, but also use of produce, cooking skill and presentation
  • Service - The staff and pace of a meal can make or break a meal out.
  • Value - From the food on the plate to service and surroundings, we check that you get what you're paying for.
Ambiance
8/10
Drinks
8/10
Food
8/10
Service
8/10
Value
8/10
Total
0%
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