Glasgow is the perfect place for the mature drinker.

With a wide selection of whiskys, beers and ales on sale across the city, you’ll be completely spoiled for choice.

To help you find the best pubs in the city for people over 40, here is a list of some of our favourite Glasgow boozers.

The Pot Still

(154 Hope St, G2 2TH, 0141 333 0980)

Picture: Trip Advisor Traveller

Picture: Trip Advisor Traveller

One of the best whisky bars in Glasgow, this characterful, traditional pub is right in the middle of the city centre. With over 600 bottlings of whisky to choose from, representing countries from all over the world, you are bound to be impressed.

Whisky fanatics will be delighted to know that all different types of whiskey are on offer: single malt, blended malt, single grain, blended grain, blended whisky, whisky liqueurs, bourbon and rye.

To help soak up all this whisky, you can order one of the famed Pot Still pies, made with meat from the same butcher the pub has been using for over 15 years.

As a family-run business, the ethos is particularly friendly and welcoming.

The pub also holds open tastings, so if you are curious about whisky, you can go along and taste to your hearts content. The Pot Still even has its own unique birthday bottling, which you can take home as a souvenir in full bottle or miniature size.

The Ben Nevis

(1147 Argyle St, G3 8TB, 0141 576 5204)

Picture: Trip Advisor Traveller

Picture: Trip Advisor Traveller

The only bad thing you can say about the Ben Nevis is that seats are scarce, due to its massive popularity. This pub celebrates “all things liquid”, with a whole wall dedicated to the finest whiskys.

You can also try distinguished local beers, or some of the best beers that Germany and South America have to offer. Their Bavarian ales are particularly good, having been carefully sourced from small producers. Food is minimal, only their famous pie and beans, but when you have so many great drinks, and when the pie is that tasty, you won’t mind at all.

The pub has been on the go for over 15 years, and it’s no wonder. Regulars are loyal, and visitors get a great taste of Glasgow. If folk is your thing, look out for the next music night, and pop in for a wee nip.

The Lismore

(206 Dumbarton Rd, G11 6UN, 0141 576 0102)

Picture: thewhiskylady.net

Picture: thewhiskylady.net

With stained glass windows, low ceilings, and lots of nooks and crannies to hide in, the Lismore is one of Glasgow’s most atmospheric pubs. It’s named after a small Hebridean island, in tribute to the regulars’ ancestors, who were evicted from their land in the Highlands and Islands during the Highland Clearances. If you look closely at the stained glass windows, you can see scenes from this tragic epoch in Scottish history.

The Lismore’s most faithful customers are particularly partial to a “hauf an’ a hauf” – a half pint served with a “half gill” of whisky. The prices are lower than your average Glasgow pub, meaning that students often join their elders for a dram.

There is also a lively folk music scene at the Lismore – with sessions taking place on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday evenings. If you want a chance to shine yourself, drop in for the open mic night on Thursdays.

But don’t be startled if the pub suddenly burst into song – there are a lot of musicians who enjoy a pint here, and they tend to bring their instruments with them.

The Horseshoe

(17-19 Drury St, G2 5AE, 0141 248 6368)

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This old-school Victorian pub has the longest bar in Europe, giving ample opportunity for its regulars to get their drink of choice. At 104 feet and three inches long, you are sure to be impressed by the bar’s epic proportions.

Fans of football and rugby will be in heaven here, because there are eleven screens throughout the pub, and early opening times for big fixtures, designed to make sure you don’t miss any of the action.

The pub also takes pride in its traditional pub grub, all freshly grilled in-house, at very reasonable prices. From 10am to 10pm you can treat yourself to a full cooked breakfast, and the Express Lunch is ideal if you have a busy day planned.

The drinks menu isn’t limited to the Scottish staples, whisky and beer – the bar offers a huge choice of beverages, from cider to spirits, and from cocktails to ales.

The Scotia

(112 – 114 Stockwell Street, Glasgow, G1 4LW, 0141 552 8681)

Picture: Trip Advisor Travellers

Picture: Trip Advisor Travellers

Established in 1792, this is the oldest pub in Glasgow, sporting a classic white and black-timbered façade and hanging flower baskets. When it first opened, it would have been a popular haunt for sailors, and, during the Victorian era, the Music Hall next door would have made the Scotia a great spot for a post-show drop of whisky.

The interior of the pub hasn’t changed much in past century. The 1920s décor makes for a cosy, historic vibe, with dark wood panelling and period light fittings. There have also been claims of ghost activity in the pub, with some mediums having heard applause by the fireplace.

The Scotia has also been very popular with musicians and performers over the years; Billy Connolly and Gerry Rafferty were regular punters back in the day. With a diverse collection of resident and non-resident bands playing rock, jazz or blues at the venue, you will be sure to find something to tap your foot in time with.

About The Author

Maddy Searle

Maddy lives in Edinburgh and has written for the Sunday Herald and the Ed Fringe Review. She is passionate about authentic, sustainably sourced food, and is always keen to discover exciting new flavours.

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