The current desire for small batch, hand-made, locally sourced produce is driving the demand for everything from clothes to food. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the drinks market, where British manufacturing is once again becoming more and more highly sought.

First seen in the craft beer movement and now reflected in spirits, small batch gin is fast becoming a prized commodity. With this in mind we went to the Good Spirits Company on Glasgow’s Bath Street, to speak to spirit expert Matthew and mixologist Graeme about their thoughts and recommendations on some of Scotland’s up-and-coming gins.

Edinburgh’s first gin distillery in 150 years has a lot to live up to but with a great location, Summerhall distillery already looks well on its way to  making its mark. Perhaps the best weapon in Pickering’s arsenal is their 60 year-old original Bombay recipe which has been tweaked and perfected for the modern palate.
Should you be interested you can visit the distillery in Edinburgh with guided tours and tastings also available on certain days. To find out more you can email the team at tours@pickeringsgin.com

Nose:

Pot pourri and classic gin. Juniper, coriander, big flavour, nice citrus background

Taste:

Neat: Orange fruit flavours, dry, nice dry finish. Parma Violets.

With tonic (one part gin to two parts Fever Tree):  Summer’s day flavours, easy-going, classic sweetness and Orange fruits.

Recommended garnish: Pink grapefruit

Matthew says: “A nice easy going gin, that’s perfect for a warm summers day.

Graeme’s choice: “I’ve chosen the 50/50 Martini, because Pickering’s and St Germain are quite floral and I’d like to see how that would work in a Martini style serve.

50/50 Martini recipe:
• 37.5ml Pickering’s gin
• 37.5ml St Germain (elderflower liqueur)
• Stirred down over ice
• Garnish with lemon peel

The 50/50 Martini

The 50/50 Martini

Pickering's gin, Edinburgh, gin review
Neat77%
With Tonic76%
77%Overall Score

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things whisky-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over six years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink.

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