There's no shortage of great bars in Glasgow, but here are a few hidden gems you might not have heard of.

Bon Accord

(153 North St, G3 7DA)

Picture: Trip Advisor Traveller

Squirreled away on North Street – across the great divider that is the M8 – you’ll find an Aladdin’s cave of drams and real ale that is more than worth the trek it takes to get there.

Run by the McDonagh family for the past 17 years, the Bon rivals the city’s famous Potstill in terms of sheer immersion in the uisge beatha (there’s more than 400 different whiskies on the gantry) and when added to the fact it has a huge amount of seating, more real ale than you can shake a cask spear at and plenty of hearty Scottish grub, you know this is the perfect place to while away in evening or two.

Redmond’s

(304 Duke St, G31 1RZ)

Picture: Redmond’s Facebook

Behind an unassuming frontage in the East End lies the kind of local that everyone dreams about.

With a relaxed vibe, plenty of seating and a great mix of locals, students and young professionals – all being kept happy with terrific service – Redmond’s is the kind of place you can go on date night, for a few pints at the weekend with a crowd or simply to prop up the bar by yourself for a few hours.

With craft beer fridges – rammed full of Scotland’s finest – wonderful food and quizzes aplenty, you’ll wonder why you haven’t visited sooner.

Inn Deep

(445 Great Western Rd, G12 8HH)

Picture: Trip Advisor Traveller

A bar that’s dog friendly, has a beer garden that looks onto a river, and has a great craft beer range and delicious food to boot? Must be Inn Deep.

A true den for beer geeks, this excellent little bar has one of the best (and most varied) craft beer ranges in the city.

Love Scottish beer? You’re covered. Fancy some of the best UK breweries like London’s Kernel and Manchester’s Cloudwater Brew Co. – check the fridges.

Fancy something further afield? Then have a quick gander at the guest slots on the three cask and eight keg lines, where you’ll find an ever shifting array of beers from the likes of Omnipollo in Sweden and Denmark’s Mikkeller.

Allison Arms

(720 Pollokshaws Rd, G41 2AD)

Picture: Allison Arms Facebook

With the external decor of a 70s Alpine lodge themed pub, the Allison Arms is one of those bars you’ll have walked by 100 times without really noticing, which is a shame, as you’ll have missed out on one of the best bars in the southside.

Despite recent competition from Marchtown, Brodies and Koelschip Yard, the Arms still rules the roost when it comes to affordability and levels of choice in its four beer fridges.

They also do a roaring trade in gins – of which they have a massive range of – though be warned, it’s still an old school boozer meaning you may be forced to sing a karaoke duet with an over exuberant regular on a Saturday night before you get to the bar.

The Old Toll Bar

(1 Paisley Rd W, G51 1LF)

Picture: SM

If this pub was in a better location – Kinning Park isn’t well known as a social hub unless you’re a Rangers fan on match day – it would quite rightly be one of the best bars in Glasgow.

As it stands, it’s pretty up there, with a stunning gantry pulled directly from a set for a Victorian film, and a great range of excellently priced beers including Old Toll Lager (brewed for them by Drygate) and a rotating line up on four guest taps and two cask pumps.

They also do no less than 10 classic cocktails, a great range of spirits and some delicious burgers that are on sale until 8pm weeknights and 9pm at the weekends.

With board games and a dog friendly outlook, if you live nearby (or even if you don’t) you might just have found your new local.

Crossing The Rubicon

(372-374 Great Western Rd, G4 9HT)

Picture: CTR Facebook

There are few better combinations than craft beer and curry and in Crossing the Rubicon – named for the point of no return in Julius Ceasar’s ascension to Emperor of Rome –  you’ll find the perfect blend of curry restaurant and hip craft beer bar.

With fourteen draught taps and three cask lines, you’ll find an ever rotating selection of excellent beers (alongside some of Drygate’s best) to wash down the amazing array of Indian delights – like Sag aloo, ox cheek bhuna and Orinoco stout and tamarind baby back ribs – from the kitchen.

 

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things whisky-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over six years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink.

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