Barbecue expert Paul Yates, who tours the country serving gourmet food on his Monolith Ceramic Grill, offers his favourite dish to celebrate St Patrick’s Day.

  • 12 hours
  • 2-3
  • Medium
The 17th of March is a time to celebrate St Patrick’s Day and what better way to start the party than with a barbecue brisket with an Irish twist. Brisket is a wonderful cut of beef; it’s inexpensive, super lean and when cooked right can rival a steak that’s four times the price.

Ingredients

  • 330ml (1 bottle) of Guinness
  • 120ml water
  • 60ml (4 tablespoons) Worcestershire sauce
  • 60ml (4 tablespoons) vegetable oil
  • 60g brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic (peeled and crushed)
  • 1 medium onion peeled and finely chopped

Method

Guinness Barbecue Brisket

According to Paul the secret to this St Patrick’s Day recipe is two fold:

  1. The Guinness (Irish stout) marinade adds tenderness and a full flavour
  2. Use a barbecue which can slow cook, indirectly. Paul uses a Monolith ceramic grill which can slow cook and retain all the juiciness in the brisket.

Brisket is normally sold as a roll, tied up with twine.

Go to your local butcher and ask for a 2kg hunk that has yet to be rolled.

Now it’s time to prepare the marinade:

Place all the ingredients in a bowl and make sure that the sugar has completely dissolved; a 30 second blast in the microwave will do this.

Chill the marinade in the refrigerator for 60 minutes and then pour over the brisket (either in a pan or better still in a large plastic bag).

To help the marinade work its magic, overhaul the brisket every hour or if in a bag, give it a squeeze.

Continue this process for a minimum of four hours.

When the marinade time is over, set your barbecue up for indirect cooking at 110°C or 225°F.

Place a water bath under the brisket and cook for about four hours.

Continue to cook at 110°C or 225°F until the core temperature of the brisket reaches 90°C (195°F) which may take a further two to four hours.

When you hit the desired core temperature, remove the brisket from the barbecue, wrap it in foil and allow it to rest for a further two hours.

During this resting phase you have plenty of time to prepare and cook the veggies.

Potatoes and cabbage lightly braised in a little more Guinness over indirect heat in the barbecue is perfect.

• For more reviews, recipe tips and advice visit Paul’s website www.barbecue-smoker-recipes.com

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things drinks-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over 10 years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink. Recently, his first book was published. Dubbed Gin Galore, it explores Scotland's best gins and the stories behind those that make them.

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About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things drinks-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over 10 years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink. Recently, his first book was published. Dubbed Gin Galore, it explores Scotland's best gins and the stories behind those that make them.