Dominic Jack gives us his elegant recipe for cheesecake with Quince sauce and white chocolate

  • Overnight
  • 4
  • Medium
This is a recipe that is best prepared the day before – ideal for a dinner party, as so much can be made in advance, leaving you more time to spend with your friends or family. I like to make individual cheesecakes as they feel more special – the dish looks pretty wow if you’re serving it to guests at home. It’s a great combination of sweet, bitter and creamy flavours. The freshness of the quince sauce, the creaminess of the cheesecake and the crunchy base all make a perfect combination of textures too. Quince is a brilliant ingredient to use at this time of year. A quince looks similar to a pear, but you can identify it by its bright bold yellow flesh. Never be tempted to eat it raw – it needs cooking to be enjoyed. I find it’s very underrated, but it can be a great addition to winter dishes – savoury or sweet. Try it as a match for pork, lamb or cheese, or roast or poach it in a dessert – it’s a nice addition to a traditional apple pie. With a unique honeyed, floral scent that just fills the room when you’re cooking, the aroma alone should be enough to warm up a winter’s day and add a little celebratory feel to those chilly, dark evenings.

Ingredients

  • For the quince sauce
  • 1 large quince – peeled and cored
  • 750ml water
  • 90g caster sugar
  • 7g pectin
  • For the base
  • 100g biscuits – Hobnobs work best
  • 50g butter
  • For the cheesecake
  • 75g white chocolate
  • 15ml egg yolk
  • 15g caster sugar
  • 50ml milk
  • 1 leaf of gelatine
  • 125g mascarpone cheese
  • 200g whipped double cream
  • To serve
  • 300g white chocolate
  • 300g cocoa butter
  • white chocolate tuile, quince jelly, sorbet, walnut praline and candied walnuts (optional)
  • You’ll also need
  • 4 x baking cylinder of around 4cm in diameter x 5cm in height
  • 1 x piping bag

Method

This is best prepared the evening before and left in the freezer overnight.

To make the quince sauce

Place 50g of the sugar and the chopped quince into a small heavy-bottomed pan. Add 750ml of water, and bring to the boil. Turn the heat down so the quince simmers gently.

Partially cover with a lid and leave to cook, testing occasionally for tenderness – make sure it is completely tender before removing the pan from the heat.

Pass through a sieve and pour the juices back into the pan. Add the remaining sugar and the pectin and mix together. Place back on the heat and begin to bring back to the boil, removing from the heat just before it boils.

Pass through a sieve again, set aside and allow to cool. Take a shallow ice cube tray and pour the mix into 12 of the cubes, then place in the freezer for 12 hours.

To make the biscuit base

Heat the butter in a small pan until it has completely melted. Crush the biscuits into small pieces in a bowl. Add the melted butter and mix well together.

To make the cheesecake filling

Melt the white chocolate over a bain-marie. You need to make an Anglaise sauce. To do this, whisk the egg yolk and caster sugar together until they become smooth.

Heat the milk in a small, heavy-bottomed pan, until it bubbles slightly at the edges, then add the mixed egg yolk and caster sugar, whisking constantly until the mixture coats the back of a spoon.

Add the melted white chocolate and the gelatine to the mixture, and mix together.

Add the mascarpone cheese and then the whipped double cream and continue to mix until completely smooth. Take off the heat.

To assemble the dish

Once the quince syrup is frozen, you can begin to assemble the dish.
Take four cylinders and place on a tray. At the bottom of each cylinder, spread a small layer of the biscuit base.

Add the cheesecake mix to a piping bag then pipe in a layer of the cheesecake mix and smooth over.

Add a cube of the quince sauce, then cover with another layer of cheesecake mix and repeat three times, smoothing the final layer of cheesecake mix over the top, then place in the freezer to set for four hours.

Heat the 300g of white chocolate and 300g cocoa butter in a bain-marie until it is completely melted. Remove the cheesecakes from the freezer, and carefully remove the cylinders. Pour a layer of white chocolate and cocoa butter mix over each cheesecake and allow to cool, then trim away any spills.

To really impress you can serve the cheesecake with a white chocolate tuile formed into a ribbon, sorbet, quince jelly, walnut praline squiggles on the plate and a candied walnut.

About The Author

Tom Kitchin and Dominic Jack

In March 2013, Tom Kitchin and close friend and fellow chef Dominic Jack opened The Scran & Scallie alongside the management team behind The Kitchin and Castle Terrace Restaurant. The pub, which is located in Stockbridge Edinburgh, presents a warm, family-friendly atmosphere, and showcases menus developed by Tom Kitchin and Dominic Jack of simple, affordable dishes executed to perfection, which demonstrate their expertise, passion and knowledge of the best suppliers in Scotland.

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About The Author

Tom Kitchin and Dominic Jack

In March 2013, Tom Kitchin and close friend and fellow chef Dominic Jack opened The Scran & Scallie alongside the management team behind The Kitchin and Castle Terrace Restaurant. The pub, which is located in Stockbridge Edinburgh, presents a warm, family-friendly atmosphere, and showcases menus developed by Tom Kitchin and Dominic Jack of simple, affordable dishes executed to perfection, which demonstrate their expertise, passion and knowledge of the best suppliers in Scotland.