Global beer giant BrewDog decided to buck the recent trend for blockbusting advertisements by creating a stripped down ad for the coveted Game of Thrones slot.

Shown during a break in the fourth episode of the final season of Game of Thrones, which attracted over 17 million viewers, the commercial simply featured the word ‘ADVERT’, a can of its beer and a heavy soundtrack from prominent metal band Messhugah.

Discussing it’s new ‘Honest’ campaign, BrewDog’s co-founder James Watt said: “Only 14 per cent of the UK population have discovered craft beer; there’s a huge untapped market. The craft beer revolution will only take hold if we convince the world to ditch the mainstream and embrace the alternative.

“We don’t want to live in a world dominated by bad beer any more than you want to live in one with lame advertising. So, we have drawn a line in the sand with this new campaign. We’ve done what we’ve always done: The exact opposite of what convention and rules expect. This is what a BrewDog TV ad looks like.”

Adding to this, Nils Leonard co-founder at Uncommon said: “The ad break in GoT is one of the most prestigious media slots in the cultural calendar. Brands often spend big here, investing in massive narratives and slick films often referencing the show they sit around. So, we didn’t.

“The magazine you notice on a busy shelf is the one with the least on the cover. Ad breaks for shows this big are a jazz salad of messages, so we set out to make the simplest, most honest message we could.”

The new campaign follows criticism on social media for the controversial brewing brand after several former marketing clients and creatives complained about their ideas being stolen and used without payment of credit by BrewDog.

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things drinks-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over 10 years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink. Recently, his first book was published. Dubbed Gin Galore, it explores Scotland's best gins and the stories behind those that make them.

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