Mumbai Mansion offers an exciting new take on Indian cuisine, discovers David Lewis

Going out for a curry is usually a pretty uncomplicated experience as far as I am concerned.

Plate of poppadoms to start with, a spice-laden chicken dish with plenty of rice for main – all washed down with several pints of Cobra.

And when my wife and I arrived at the Mumbai Mansion on Morrison Street, our first instinct was for more of the same.

But manager Merwyn Pereira wasn’t having it, steering us away from our usual Jalfrezi for me, Korma for her (plenty of poppadoms, lots of Cobra, etc) and gently suggesting that we added a touch of diversity to our Indian cuisine armoury.

Merwyn – who previously worked at Mithas in Leith and has assembled a highly skilled and experienced team – seemed to know what he was talking about, so we allowed him to take us on a culinary adventure.

He was keen to point out that, unlike many of their competitors, frying is absolutely banned in the Mumbai Mansion kitchen. Instead, meals are prepared on the grill and in a clay oven with the emphasis on serving up food that is good for you.

For starters, Merwyn dished out Lamb Shami Kebab, Chargrilled Prawns and Sea Bass for us to share.

He helpfully pointed out that Lamb Shami Kebab (£6.50) would not be what we expected (ie, skewered chunks of lamb) but we weren’t disappointed. The neatly packaged mince of lamb stuffed with ricotta cheese and mint was unlike anything we’d ever tasted in an Indian restaurant. It was light and delicate and left us wanting more.

With Chargrilled Prawns (£7.95), there’s always the fear they’ll have been left rubbery after a whirl in a microwave – but this certainly wasn’t the case at the Mumbai Mansion, where they had been marinated in a mix of dry spices and fresh mint.

We couldn’t recall ever dining on seafood in an Indian restaurant, so there was some trepidation as we tackled the Sea Bass (£7.95), but we needn’t have worried. A crispy coconut topping helped bring the succulent taste to the fore.

When it came to the mains, our pre-arrival plans weren’t completely thrown out of the window; we managed to get our Chicken Jalfrezi (£11.50), the flavour of which was enhanced beautifully with fresh tomato flavouring.

Also to share, Merwyn proudly presented us with a Breast of Duck (£12.95). The meat tore easily away and could have been eaten twice over.

Our stomachs feeling more than satisfied but far from bursting, as is usually the case after two courses in an Indian restaurant, we again allowed Merwyn to select our desserts. The Indian Trio (£5.95) – rice pudding, carrot halwa served with lime cheesecake and caramelised dumplings – the three-option Fresh Sorbet Selection (£4.95) and the Fresh Ice-Cream Selection (£4.95) topped off the meal magnificently, with a rush of fresh pineapple.

Our dinner was washed down not by four pints of Cobra, but a shared bottle of Viognier (£28.95) from Eden Valley. The wine complemented our food perfectly.

The Mumbai Mansion has certainly upped its game since a previous visit several years ago. With new management and new staff, it’s certainly heading in a very different direction. Yes, you can pop in for a quick curry and a few beers – but this is one Indian restaurant that has much more to offer.

HOW MUCH?

Dinner for two, excluding drinks – £62.70

 

Mumbai Mansion, Edinburgh, restaurant review
Food 85%
Ambience85%
85%Overall Score
Reader Rating: (1 Vote)
76%

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