The Butchershop Bar and Grill in Glasgow looks to showcase some of best steaks Scotland has to offer with its 'Cuts On The Bone' range

On their quest to source and serve the best steak in the world, award-winning Glasgow steakhouse The Butchershop Bar & Grill in Glasgow has launched a new premium range of colossal Scottish steaks for sharing called Cuts On The Bone.

Perfect for sharing – or eating alone if you’re up to the challenge – four delicious cuts have been developed; from the exquisite jewel-in-the-crown buttery-textured fillet on the bone that’s rarely seen (even in some of the world’s best steakhouses), the ‘king of steaks’ porterhouse, the classic well-marbled sirloin on the bone and the succulent Flintstone-esque bone in rib steak that is the Tomahawk.

Ranging in size from 700g to 2kg, these awe-inspiring cuts are hung on the bone in their own ‘Butchershop’ dry-aging room in an exclusive partnership with Cairnhill Farm in Girvan, where their fourth-generation master butcher hangs the grass-fed Scottish beef for 45 days, allowing each cut the correct amount of time to reach the optimum buttery melt-in-your-mouth flavour level.

 “We cook each cut simply allowing the superior quality and provenance of the meat to shine through”

Speaking about the new Cuts On The Bone steaks, restaurateur owner of The Butchershop Bar & Grill and Grade A Listed dining venue Hutchesons Bar & Brasserie, James Rusk says: “Scotland is renowned for having the best beef in the world, and we wanted to heighten that reputation and create something truly spectacular for our customers and visitors to Scotland to experience.  As a company our ethos is to deliver the exceptional the same way every day and by working closely with our butcher we have created a serious range of big cuts with an even bigger unbelievable flavour that we’re proud to showcase and call our own.

“Our Tomahawk has already been a massive hit after an extended trial with customers, but it’s our fillet on the bone that’s really getting our kitchen team and staff in a meat frenzy.

Head chef John Molloy with one of the famed Tomahawk steaks

Head chef John Molloy with one of the famed Tomahawk steaks

“It’s also very fitting that it’s Scotland Year of Food and Drink where we can shine the spotlight on our fantastic natural larder. We’re already committed to Visit Scotland’s Taste Our Best quality assurance scheme and our new range of cuts is testament to our focus on quality and provenance.”

Butchershop head chef, John Molloy said: “As a chef you want to work with the best produce in the world and this is as good as it gets. These cuts are phenomenal; the flavour from the fillet on the bone is like nothing you’ve ever tasted. Scotch fillet steak would normally be aged from 21 up to 28 days whereas with a fillet on the bone cut, the bone allows the meat to be aged for 45 days resulting in an unsurpassed enhanced flavour.

“We cook each cut simply allowing the superior quality and provenance of the meat to shine through. From our staple classic cuts to our new exciting cuts on the bone addition, there’s something for everyone.”

Cuts can be dry-aged for shorter periods of time like their classic and signature cut which range from 21 – 35 days however after years of research with their butcher they have found that the optimum dry-aging time for the perfect flavour for the cuts on the bone steaks is 45 days. This length of time ensures that they keep the integrity of the great Scotch beef flavour but at the same time allow for optimum tenderness.

The Butcher Shop Bar and Grill

The Butcher Shop Bar and Grill

• For more information on the Cuts on the bone – which are available every day – visit www.butchershopglasgow.com or Facebook.com/Butchershopglasgow

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things drinks-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over 10 years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink. Recently, his first book was published. Dubbed Gin Galore, it explores Scotland's best gins and the stories behind those that make them.

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