Over the last few years, gin has seen a huge revival and is now one of the top selling spirits.

And in Scotland, we have seen a range of new distilleries opening within the last two years alone.

But have you ever wondered which of these is a top choice?

After the successful launch of their Scottish gin map, the Scottish Gin Society recently launched a survey to find out the nation’s favouite gin.

Their members and social followers were asked to vote for their most-loved gin as part of the Society’s preparations for World Gin Day.

favourite

Picture: Scottish Gin Society

The results were announced this week, with the Society explaining: “As part of our preparations for World Gin Day celebrations, we want to feature the top Scottish gins (according to the public) in some exclusive cocktails, designed by the team at Solid Liquids who are behind the Juniper Festival, as well as giving people a chance to vote for the gin they love.

“We had thousands of responses in a few days,  and the results were an astounding mix, with many of the craft Scottish gins receiving a lot of votes and there being a fraction of a percentage between many.”

So, here are the top 10 Scottish gins, as voted for by the Scottish Gin Society’s gin-lovers…

10: Misty Isle Gin – Isle of Skye

9:  Hendricks Gin – Girvan

8: Rock Rose Gin – Dunnet Bay

7: Redcastle Gin – Angus

6: The Botanist – Islay

5: McQueen Gin – Callander

4: Kintyre Gin – Campbeltown

3: Caorunn Gin – Grantown-on Spey

2: Edinburgh Gin – Edinburgh

1: Isle of Harris Gin – Isle of Harris

The Scottish Gin Society said of the results: “While the top two weren’t big surprises – Harris Gin (who received just over 10% of the votes) is always a firm favourite and famous for its’ iconic bottle and fresh flavour, while Edinburgh Gin (with 5%) is widely distributed, well loved, with many innovative products coming from the distillery.

Harris

Picture: Harris gin was voted the favourtie, Gray’s Deli Glasgow

“However, get a little further down the list and you’ll see some much smaller distilleries featuring.  For us, it is wonderful to see these feature alongside the big brands.  It demonstrates their devoted following, as passionate fans are keen to vote for them.”

The Society were also interested to note that the geographical spread of the gins was vast, meaning that no one region is taking precedence over another.

About The Author

Rosalind Erskine

Known for cake making, experimental jam recipes, Champagne and gin drinking (and the inability to cook Gnocchi), Rosalind writes for The Scotsman on all things food and drink related.

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