Easter is one of our favourite times of the year, and for good reason, it's the only time it's socially acceptable to stuff your face with chocolate eggs.

For producers it can often be hard to stand out from Cadbury’s and Thorton’s on the supermarket shelf, yet some have found a way to go the extra mile and in spectacular fashion.

These are some of the Easter eggs that really stopped us in our tracks this year and left us feeling a little confused (and yes, extremely curious).

If Dr Moreau made Easter eggs we’re sure even his would struggle to match some of these weird and wonderful offerings.

The Irn-Bru and Bacon Chilli Chocolate Easter Egg

(Available from: Chillilicious, Price: £10.95 )

Easter eggs

Picture: Chillilicious

We love Chillicious, as Scotland’s only chilli farm we admire their ability to buck the trend by growing such an exotic crop in Scotland’s erratic climate.

Not only that, they’ve made a roaring success of it, and that’s led to some truly excellent, and often innovative, products.

This Easter egg is a shining example.

The kind of egg we’d expect to be conjured up in the fevered dreams of a terribly hungover Scot, it contains everything we need for a cure for the after effects of an Easter Eve blowout.

Bacon – check, Irn-Bru – check, chocolate – check, chilli – em, well actually now that you mention it, that might just work.

• READ MORE:  Glengoyne unveils the ultimate whisky-lover’s Easter egg

The Buckfast Easter Egg

(Available from: D-Bees, in Lurgan, Co Armagh, Price: £9.99 )

Picture: SWNS

Like all Buckfast products, this Easter egg caused something of a stir when it was unveiled to the public on social media by an off-sales in Northern Ireland.

Despite the usual outcry, there was massive support from fans of the drink. So much so, that D-Bees, the shop that created it in Lurgan, Co Armagh, took more than 2,000 orders within 24 hours of first advertising it..

Sadly, it doesn’t look like the Easter bunny will be delivering too many of them to adults around the UK as not long after, Trading Standards were called by the company who bottle and distribute the wine made by the Benedictine monks, and all of the eggs were then destroyed.

The Marmite Easter Egg

(Available from: All good local supermarkets, Price: £4 )

The old adage for Marmite – you either love it or hate it – doesn’t seeem to apply here as the Marmite Easter egg has apparently been flying off of the shelves.

They’ve even taken the secondary market by storm with people flogging them on them for tow or three times the original price on eBay.

We aren’t all that convinced that Marmite flavoured chocolate works but it seems many other people around the country are.

Pot Noodle ‘Bombay Bad Boy’ Chilli Chocolate Egg and Mug

(Available from: Amazon.co.uk, Asda , Price: £4)

Two things that should never be mixed are pot noodles and chocolate but it seems that’s exactly what’s happened here and we aren’t sure how to feel about it.

Luckily, it seems the producers have gone for chilli flavoured chocolate instead of you know, chicken and mushroom or beef and tomato, meaning that it is probably a lot tastier than it sounds.

The Cheaster Egg

(Available from: Iceland, Price: £3)

Not to be outdone in the unusual Easter Egg stakes, Iceland have gone completely the other way and introduced the Cheaster Egg (maybe Cheeseter would have been better) by Ford Farm, an egg shaped serving of Wensleydale Cheese with raspberry & white chocolate curls.

Call us weird but we actually think this might be the most enticing of the lot!

About The Author

Sean Murphy

Driven by a passion for all things whisky-related, Sean writes for The Scotsman extensively on the subject. He can also sometimes be found behind the bar at the world famous Potstill bar in Glasgow where he continues to enhance his whisky knowledge built up over six years advising customers from all over the world on the wonders of our national drink.

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