Looking to enjoy a spot of haggis in the Granite City? We've picked out five of the best places to enjoy Scottish cuisine in Aberdeen.

Famous for bright northern lights and grey northern granite, Aberdeen has not, until recently, been famed for great gastronomy.

However, things are changing. As the use of Scotland’s larder becomes more popular, the plentiful countryside surrounding Aberdeen and the bountiful north sea have produced ingredients to put the city firmly on the foodie map.

We took a trip to The Granite City to seek out the local produce and check out some of best Scottish restaurants in Aberdeen.

Native

(31 St Andrew St, Aberdeen, AB25 1JA)

Aberdeen

Picture: Contributed

Liquid and The Priory may be a distant memory but luckily one Aberdeen institution is still going strong, despite dropping the Nick Nairn name.

Native, based in the Hilton Garden Inn is one of Aberdeen’s most famous spots and if you’re looking for a Scottish restaurant in Aberdeen, this is the place to head.

Being focused on local produce, Aberdeen Angus beef and north sea fish feature heavily on the menu.

The pan-fried seabass and the 8oz fillet steak were particular favourites as we did our best to work through the extensive wine list.

No true dinner out is complete without dessert and the rose panacotta is a perfectly odd and really tasty way to finish off your meal.

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Howie’s

(50 Chapel Street , Aberdeen, AB10 1SN)

Aberdeen

Picture: Howie’s

A quintessential Scottish restaurant, Howie’s has all the elements you’d expect to find; stags heads, roaring fires, and exposed walls.

Not to mention a menu absolutely stuffed with Scottish produce.

Think comfort food crossed with fine dining, there’s Cullen Skink, ham hock, the finest Scottish steaks and an ever-changing catch of the day.

It’s the type of place to head when you’re in the mood for some really good food but don’t fancy getting the side-eye when you loosen your belt to accommodate it.

It wouldn’t really be a round-up of Scottish restaurants in Aberdeen without a decent whisky selection and Howie’s has a huge choice of drams to enjoy before heading off into that cold northern night.

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Angus and Ale

(55 Schoolhill, Aberdeen, AB10 1JT)

Aberdeen

Picture: Angus & Ale

Is there anything more Scottish than a big Aberdonian coo? We doubt it!

Angus and Ale focuses on the best quality beef, from the Aberdeenshire area, with a big helping of great ales from Scotland.

(Aberdeenshire boys Brewdog are listed, as is Harviestoun’s Schiehallion, while Glasgow’s Drygate beers are also featured heavily).

Fine dining this is not.

It’s plates of “dirty food” piled high and determined to leave you full and happy if you can finish them.

Obviously the burgers are fantastic but it’s the steaks that really steal the show.

Cooked on their in-house clam grill, they go perfectly with the rosemary chips and peppercorn sauce, both of which are plentiful.

No bookings, just drop by!

No.10 Restaurant & Bar

(10 Queens Terrace, Aberdeen, AB10 1XL)

Aberdeen

Picture: No. 10

“Whits for ye, won’t go by ye” Grannies are prone to say, and you’d be hard-pressed to walk past No.10 without heading in.

The entrance may be located below street-level but that doesn’t stop it being inviting, even from above.

Another venue with an impressive gantry of Scotland’s best tipple, No 10 works if you’re just popping by for a dram or you want a really great feed.

There’s everything you’d expect in a good Scottish menu and we particularly enjoyed the steak with added breaded langoustines and a blue cheese sauce.

If you take our word and love the place, you can also book out their  private room overlooking the restaurant for any special Scottish occasions you have.

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210 Bistro

(210 South Market Street, Aberdeen, AB11 5PQ)

Aberdeen

Picture: 210 Bistro

210 Bistro is perhaps not the most traditional of Scottish restaurants in Aberdeen, but it is one of the best.

Set near the iconic Aberdeen harbour, it gives gorgeous views over the North Sea and is just a skip away from the bustling city centre.

Tuck into classics like corn fed chicken or venison loin or push the boat out with rock turbot or duck babotie.

Everything comes in perfectly sized portions to line your stomach before heading over to Belmont Street for a few drinks.

Alternatively, relax in 210 Bistro’s bar with a classic cocktail or one designed specifically for the season.

(Autumn’s include pumpkin pie and a caramel apple mimosa….yum!)

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About The Author

Claire Murray

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