Arguably, Scotland's national food is haggis, neeps and tatties. This meal of meat, turnip and potato is an important part of Scottish identity, and Edinburgh is one of the best places to try it for the first time.

Here are our best places to eat haggis, neeps and tatties in Edinburgh.
Best places for Haggis in Edinburgh

Best places for Haggis in Edinburgh

Hadrian’s Brasserie at the Balmoral

(North Bridge Brasserie, 1 Princes St, EH22, 0131 557 5000)

You can count on this five-star brasserie for a classy evening out or a stylish light lunch.

It is a part of Edinburgh’s iconic Balmoral Hotel, which played host to J. K. Rowling when she was writing the final Harry Potter novel.

The walls of the brasserie are adorned with pictures of pirouetting dancers, and the food is just as beautiful.

Although Hadrian’s has a Michelin star chef, the haggis, neeps and tatties is relatively inexpensive, and pretty good value for money. It is also served with a delectable whisky cream.

The World’s End

(2-8 High St, EH1 1TB, 0131 556 3628)

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This pub has a centuries-long history, a fantastic atmosphere, and plenty of Belhaven beer.

Its clientèle comes from all over the world, which can be seen from the collection of foreign bank notes behind the bar.

The name of the pub derives from the sixteenth century, when the pub was situated right next to the old city walls, making the the “end of the world” for Edinburgh residents.

The interior is dark, with dimmed lights and hidden alcoves.

The delicious haggis dish is served in the form of a haggis potato pie, topped with grated cheddar cheese, and served with home-made whisky sauce.

Whiski Bar

(119 High St, EH1 1SG, 0131 556 3095)

This warm, friendly restaurant has live Scottish music every night.

There are over 300 Scotch malt whiskies to choose from, and Macsween’s award-winning haggis to taste.

You can have a haggis stack as a starter, or a haggis tower as a main course, with the obligatory neeps and tatties.

There is also a vegetarian option.

The haggis tower may be pricier than in other restaurants, but this is because Whiski Bar ensures the highest quality local produce.

Arcade Bar, Haggis and Whisky House

(48 Cockburn St, EH1 1PB, 0131 220 1297)

Lunch with mam

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This bar specialises in all things related to haggis and whisky. There are two main courses which include haggis at Arcade, the most traditional being “Robert Burns’ Famous Haggis”, which is served in a tower with whisky sauce.

The second is called the “Princess Diana Style Haggis” which is served with a cream sauce, containing tomatoes, onions and Drambuie, instead of the whisky sauce.

You can pair your meal with any one of 100 whiskies, or even a speciality fair trade tea. One of these teas would go especially well with the Scottish breakfast, which also contains haggis, alongside bacon, sausage, hash browns, mushrooms, beans, eggs, tomatoes, and crispy toasts.

The Royal McGregor

(154 High St, EH1 1QS, 0131 225 7064)

#haggis happening.

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The Royal McGregor is relatively new on the Royal Mile, the historic street which runs from Edinburgh Castle to Holyrood Palace.

Over the past ten years, it has gained a foothold in this competitive area of the city.

It is decorated with bold thistle wallpaper, and serves the best Scottish produce.

You can try the haggis as a starter, in the form of haggis bon bons, served with turnip purée.

Alternatively, you can have a Highland burger as a main course, which comes with haggis and whisky sauce.

The most traditional option is the haggis tower with red onion and rosemary gravy, which also comes as a vegetarian counterpart.

About The Author

Maddy Searle

Maddy lives in Edinburgh and has written for the Sunday Herald and the Ed Fringe Review. She is passionate about authentic, sustainably sourced food, and is always keen to discover exciting new flavours.

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